Jonathan Mann, age 51, died September 1998 in SwissAir Flight 111 over Canada. He was founding director of the World Health Organization’s global Aids program and founded Project SIDA in Zaire, the most comprehensive Aids research effort in Africa at the time, and in 1986 he joined the WHO to lead the global response against Aids. He became director of WHO’s global program on Aids which later became the UNAids program. He then became director of the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, which was set up at Harvard School of Public Health in 1993. He caused controversy earlier in 1998 in the media when he accused the US National Institutes of Health of violating human rights by failing to act quickly on developing Aids vaccines.Jonathan Mann, age 51, died September 1998 in SwissAir Flight 111 over Canada. He was founding director of the World Health Organization’s global Aids program and founded Project SIDA in Zaire, the most comprehensive Aids research effort in Africa at the time, and in 1986 he joined the WHO to lead the global response against Aids. He became director of WHO’s global program on Aids which later became the UNAids program. He then became director of the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, which was set up at Harvard School of Public Health in 1993. He caused controversy earlier in 1998 in the media when he accused the US National Institutes of Health of violating human rights by failing to act quickly on developing Aids vaccines.Jonathan Mann, age 51, died September 1998 in SwissAir Flight 111 over Canada. He was founding director of the World Health Organization’s global Aids program and founded Project SIDA in Zaire, the most comprehensive Aids research effort in Africa at the time, and in 1986 he joined the WHO to lead the global response against Aids. He became director of WHO’s global program on Aids which later became the UNAids program. He then became director of the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, which was set up at Harvard School of Public Health in 1993. He caused controversy earlier in 1998 in the media when he accused the US National Institutes of Health of violating human rights by failing to act quickly on developing Aids vaccines.

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